Burn ban in effect for DNR lands

Despite this morning’s light rain, with the recent heat wave increasing fire danger throughout the state, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources is expanding the burn ban from DNR-protected lands to include Western Washington. The burn ban will run from today through September 30, 2014. It applies to all forestlands under DNR fire protection.

“Washington is experiencing high heat and very low humidity, which is creating a dangerous situation,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “We are asking everyone to take extra care to avoid any risk of causing a fire.”

This fire season, there have already been 265 fires on DNR-protected lands, with the majority caused by humans. DNR protects about 13 million acres throughout the state and operates the state’s largest fire-fighting force, witdnrh more than 1,000 trained staff ready to be deployed where needed.

Hot and dry conditions increase the potential for wildfire over the next several weeks on both sides of the Cascades. With the current heat wave projected to last into next week, DNR is urging people to be extra vigilant.

All outdoor burning on DNR-protected forestlands is prohibited during the ban, with two exceptions. Recreational fires in approved fire pits within designated state, county, municipal or other campgrounds, and gas or propane stoves/barbeque grills are allowed. DNR-approved prescribed fires for ecological purposes may be permitted if expressly approved by the Commissioner of Public Lands.

Fireworks and incendiary devices, such as exploding targets, sky lanterns, or tracer ammunition, are illegal on all DNR-protected forestlands. Charcoal briquettes are not allowed.

Categories: KXRO Outdoors

Mason County Sheriff’s Office welcomes first ever female Corporal

In the history of the Mason County Sheriff’s Office established in 1854, there has never been the rank and position of Corporal. On Friday, Tammy Filyaw was promoted to the rank of Corporal by Mason County Sheriff Casey Salisbury. Corporal Filyaw is also the very first female Corporal in the history of the Mason County Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff Salisbury stated that both the Mason County Sheriff’s Office and the citizens that they serve are fortunate to have such a high caliber of Deputies and Officers to be promoted to positions of leadership. This speaks well of the entire Sheriff’s Office, and he is proud to continue the legacy of professionalism by promoting personnel such as Corporal Filyaw.

Corporal Tammy Filyaw is the first of four Corporals to be promoted from Jail Officers and the fifth Corporal overall to be promoted in the Sheriff’s Office. Corporal Filyaw is a resident of Shelton and has worked for the Mason County Sheriff’s Office for approximately three and a half years.

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Categories: Northwest News

Taxes from the first few days of legal marijuana

Washington will haul in nearly $150,000 in excise taxes from the first three days of legal marijuana sales – and that doesn’t include state and local sales taxes.

Randy Simmons, the Liquor Control Board’s project manager for legal pot, says that’s not bad, considering the market is in its infancy, with only a few stores open statewide.

The law, voters passed in 2012 to legalize pot, specifies that excise taxes of 25 percent are imposed when producers sell their product to licensed retail stores, and another 25 percent is imposed when shops sell to consumers.

All excise taxes due from the first day of sales Tuesday totaled $61,604. The figure dipped to $30,924 on Wednesday, and rose to $55,728 on Thursday, for a total of $148,256.

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Categories: KXRO Community

Weekend accidents send 4 to the hospital

2 accidents this weekend sent 4 people to the hospital.

A three vehicle accident 9 miles north of Hoquiam on highway 101 sent three people to the hospital on Friday afternoon.

An 18 year old Aberdeen teen traveling north in a 1987 Toyota pick up, on State Route 101, crossed the center line and struck a 2009 Kenworth with a loaded log trailer, head on.

A 2002 Dodge Dakota pick up being driven by a 19 year old Montesano teen that was following, struck the Toyota, forcing it off the road.

The 38 year old Hoquiam man driving the log truck and the two teens were taken to Grays Harbor Community Hospital and the driver of the Toyota was air lifted to Harbor View Medical Center.

The Washington State Patrol says drugs and alcohol were not involved, the cause is under investigation.

The road was blocked for 5 and half hours.

DUI Accident

Saturday morning, a DUI was the cause of an accident that sent a 41 year old man and his 2004 Chevrolet Malibu into a tree.

Early Saturday morning, around ½ mile north of Ocean Shores, the car left the road, striking the tree and totaling the car.

The driver was transported to Grays Harbor Community Hospital.

The Washington State Patrol says the cause of the accident was Driving Under the Influence.

WSP Car

Categories: Harbor News

Measles case count in WA up drastically from last year, continuing to spread

Washington has had more measles cases so far this year than in the past five years combined. State health officials are reminding people that vaccination is the best protection against the spread of this serious and preventable disease.

So far in 2014 there have been 27 measles cases in Washington, up from the five reported in 2013. The most recent cases reported in the past month have been in King County, with 11 confirmed cases, and Pierce County, with two confirmed cases. No cases have been recorded so far in Grays Harbor or Pacific County.

This is the third measles outbreak in our state this year and the number of cases so far is the highest reported in any year since 1996. People can check the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department and Multicare websites for a list of places visited by cases while they were contagious. Anyone who visited places at the listed dates and times should find out if they’ve been vaccinated for measles or have had the disease.

Washington’s trend reflects the national trend. From Jan. 1 to July 3 of this year, the U.S. has experienced the highest number of cases since elimination of ongoing measles virus circulation in the U.S. was documented in 2000.  Almost all of these cases are attributed to 17 outbreaks.

The resurgence is linked to several factors — people not being vaccinated, and the fact that measles is still common in many parts of the world. Travelers with the measles continue to bring the disease to the U.S. and it spreads when it reaches communities where groups of people aren’t vaccinated.

Measles is highly contagious even before the rash starts. It spreads easily when an infected person breathes, coughs, or sneezes — if you’re not vaccinated, you can get the measles just by walking into a room where someone with the disease has been in the past couple of hours. Of every 1000 people with measles, one is likely to get encephalitis, and one or two may die.

The MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) vaccine is recommended for kids 12 months and older, health care workers, college students, adults born after 1956, and people who travel internationally. Pregnant women should not get the vaccine until after giving birth.

Children should be vaccinated with two doses of MMR vaccine, with the first dose between 12 and 15 months and the second at four to five years of age. Children aged six to11 months who will be travelling internationally should receive one dose of MMR at least two weeks before departure. Adults should have at least one measles vaccination, with some people needing two. Anyone planning to travel should make sure they are immune to measles before leaving the U.S. Vaccine can be found by calling your health care provider or by checking the online vaccine finder for a location near you.

People who are unvaccinated, or aren’t sure if they’re immune, and develop an illness with fever and rash should consult a health care professional immediately. Call ahead to your clinic, doctor’s office, or emergency room before arriving to avoid exposing others in waiting rooms.

More information about measles and vaccine can be found by visiting the agency’s immunization web pages.

The Department of Health website (www.doh.wa.gov) is your source for a healthy dose of information. Also, find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

DOH9

Categories: KXRO Community

Grays Harbor Fire District 2 to hold public meetings on hospital district impacts

Grays Harbor Fire District 2 will be holding two public meetings to discuss the possible impacts of the proposed Hospital District No. 2 and the proposed annexation by Hospital District No. 1.

The fire district covers 304 square miles from Central Park to Brady and outlying areas. The purpose for the meetings is to let residents know how overlapping hospital districts would impact Fire District 2’s property tax levy. The district is faced with a potential decrease of its regular property tax levy if a hospital district overlaps its boundaries.

Representatives from the fire district have said at public meetings that with shared taxing districts, it would create added work for their departments. At those meetings, a request to not include Central Park into the proposed district was raised.

This week, Summit Pacific Medical Center held a public hearing on the proposed annexation of Montesano into Public Health District No. 1 to extend their reach as well. Any change to the boundaries of the already established district would need to be approved by voters and could be added to the November ballot.

Representatives from both Grays Harbor Community Hospital and Summit Pacific Medical Center (Grays Harbor Public Hospital District No. 1) will be on hand to answer questions.

Meetings are scheduled for:

• Tuesday, July 15, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.
Headquarters Station (Central Park)
6317 Olympic Highway, Aberdeen, WA 98520

• Wednesday, July 23, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.
Station 32 (Brady)
8 Fire Station Road, Montesano, WA 98563

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Fire Chief Leonard Johnson at 360-532-6050 or via email at admin@gfhd2.net. You can also visit the Fire District’s website at http://www.ghfd2.org.

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Categories: KXRO Community

Aberdeen Downtown Revitalization Project Plans: A Three Year Action Plan

The Aberdeen City Council heard a report from Cary Bozeman about their revitalization project, talking about what is needed to get the job done.

The City of Aberdeen hired Cary Bozeman 4 months ago to turn around the downtown and he spoke to the council last night about their three year action plan.

“I know money is the issue here. Everybody’s worried about money, but let’s not be worried about money right now.”

He said that our local unemployment rate is a double edged sword, “with demographics we have that say we’re the highest unemployment in the state, or one of them. That’s a good news/bad news thing. The good news is, people understand we have economic challenges and they’re willing to help. The bad news is, we have a high unemployment rate. But, good news is, people are willing to help.”

Bozeman also read sections of a report about revitalizing Aberdeen from 1968, and he says it was on point even back then.

He said the report points to issues of many travelers just passing through the town without stopping on their way to the beaches or Olympic National Forest.

“The city has the advantage of being so situated that all roads lead through from Southwest Washington, Northwest Oregon, and the densely populated Puget Sound area. It’s so true. It’s amazing that everyone comes over to that one area.

Bozeman said the City has to do something.

“I know people are scared about the risk, the financial risk, but there’s more risk in not doing anything.”

The three year action plan includes a downtown riverfront park, gateway center, and traffic opportunities. Each project has a list of potential partners to help with funding,

Click here for a look at the Aberdeen Downtown Revitalization Project Plans: A Three Year Action Plan

ARM Plan

Categories: Harbor News
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